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Product Review: Quit It!

compressedairpetsprayQuit It! is a can of compressed air that emits a loud hiss when you press the button on top. This sound is designed to interrupt your dog’s mindset when he is doing something that you’re trying to stop, such as jumping on visitors, digging in plants, or barking at the neighbors.

I had heard about the sound deterrent concept, and had tried some coins in an aluminum can, to no avail. I also tried the water gun, which worked on one dog, but not the other (who seemed to love it) I was a bit skeptical when I received the can. It seemed gimmicky and I wasn’t sure it would work.

But it just so happened that I had a dog who runs around the yard barking at the neighbors’ dogs in their yards. She would throw her hips at the fence, and since she’s a large dog, I was concerned that she might actually get the fence loose or break a board. One of my neighbors’ dog actually eggs her on, coming right up to the other side of the fence, barking and digging under the fence.

This same dog of mine also stole food off the kitchen counters. She was getting bad about it. No bagel (or stick of butter) was safe in my kitchen.

It took me a few weeks to try the product, since I wasn’t excited about it, but once I did my attitude totally changed. I sprayed it when she was stealing a piece of bread off the kitchen island and three months later, she hasn’t done it since. Wow.

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Encouraged by my success, I tried it on her when she went out into the back yard. As soon as she began to run for the fence, I sprayed the Quit It! and she turned around and ran toward me. No barking, no hurling herself against the fence, no drama. It took about three times on three different days to cure her of it.

I totally underestimated this product. My husband explained it to me. He’s a law enforcement officer and he said that when we are in a highly agitated state, our minds operate in a continuous loop of processing stimulus and reacting to it. Dogs may operate in much the same way. It is instrumental in both hunting and escaping danger. When I try to use a treat to get my dog away from the fence bordering my neighbor’s yard, she doesn’t seem to notice the treat because her mind is cycling in a loop of stimulus and reaction. But a loud noise interrupts that cycle, breaking her out of the loop momentarily and giving her a chance to think about something else for a second or two. If I did nothing at that point, she might go back to barking at the dog, but probably with much less intensity. This is the philosophy of the citronella bark collars, too. A fine mist of spray is unexpected and momentarily disorients the dog, giving the brain enough time the disengage from the overwhelming focus on the stimulus. This is also why police SWAT teams and military soldiers use flash bang grenades before entering a hostile situation. The flash of light and loud bang break the targets out of their concentrations and allow the good guys a chance to slip in and get control of the momentarily disoriented perpetrators.

There’s more information about why it works at the manufacturer’s website (below).
You may have to spray a handful of times the first time you use it. Because it surprises the dog, she may just stop what she’s doing at first, and look at you. But if you spray it again, she’ll likely get down, drop the shoe, stop barking or whatever she was doing. After that, she may respond at the first blast. Or, as with my dog, she may stop the unwanted behavior just by seeing you grab the can.

Some dogs are very tuned in to auditory training cues, and I think my test dog is. I can stop her with my voice from doing some things, and she’s sensitive to our family members’ tone of voice. She seems distressed if she hears someone who’s upset. So it may not work as quickly on other dogs, and on some, not at all. But my experience with this product was successful and fast. It worked so well on my dog that I don’t even need the can anymore. Now, when ever she freezes and stares in the direction of a neighbor’s dog whose tags are jangling and who is barking, I just say, “Shhht!” and she comes to me.

NOTE: You should not use the product close to your dog, as dogs have sensitive hearing and you could hurt their ears or damage hearing if you’re too close. Also, you may have other pets in the room or yard who could be affected when you’re using the spray for the problem dog. But that could be a good thing, too. I’ve seen this product stop a dog fight at the dog park. It made both dogs pause long enough for both owners to grab their collars and get them separated. I carry it with me when I go to the dog park, in case there’s another fight. I carry it when I’m walking my own dogs around the neighborhood, in case there’s an aggressive loose dog around.

At $24 for two 4-ounce cans, it is on the pricey side. However, when you think about solving a problem for $24, it may sound pretty darned affordable.

Here are some other reviews I’ve found, from testers who used it on both dogs and cats.

Buy it from: BuyQuitIt.com

 

The manufacturer’s website says it’s $10, but you also have to pay $6.99 shipping, and you also have to pay $6.99 for a second can (you do not have the option to order just one). So the real cost to buy it is just under $12 per can. Still, it’s affordable as a training aid that may work for you.

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Posted by on October 3, 2013 in Dog Product Reviews

 

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Rinse That Dog Off!

At $50 billion, the pet industry is huge, and growing. One of the fun things about being a part of it is discovering cool entrepreneurs who are finding ingenious ways to help us care for and have fun with our dogs. One of these people is Chris Crawford from Carlsbad, CA. An avid outdoorsman, Chris has invented the RinseKit, a portable, high-pressure mini-shower for washing off your stuff, your dog, your feet … anything, before getting into your car, tent or home.

How many times have you come back to the car from the dog park, lake, or a walk through the woods with your dog, only to look down in dismay at those muddy feet, that drenched fur, that smelly coat? I know I have. And what I’ve done is just bite the bullet. That’s life with dogs, right? You wait for the mud to dry and then take the car to a car wash with a vacuum. But what if you could quickly shower off the dog (or his feet at least) before letting him into the car?  

The RinseKit stores not only water, but water pressure. So when you squeeze the hose attachment, you actually have water pressure to spray off mud, leaves, sand … even ants.

Yes, ants.

I live in the land of fire ants and my big dumb 50-pound puppy stood (not stepped, STOOD) in an ant hill a month or two back. Her front paws were COVERED in biting ants. My little water bottle was pathetic, and with her fur, there was no brushing them off with our hands. Fortunately, we were at the lake, so my quick-thinking 7 year old snapped the leash on her and ran her down to stand in the lake. What if we hadn’t been right on the shore? I would have loved having this thing to get those ants off her quickly.

This bad boy can clean off whatever your dog tracks in. It’s so much better than trying to clean up with a dinky water bottle. That is, if you have any water left in it. And the little paw towels that you can buy at the pet supply store? Those are great when the mess isn’t very … messy. But I have tried using towels for mud, and maybe it’s me, but they just don’t work.

Having grown up in New England, I could see using it to get rid of those awful ice balls that form on dogs’ fur when they’ve been playing in the snow. You know, those days when it’s above freezing, but still cold enough for snow, and your dog is dying to go play in it. My long-haired Dachshund used to come back to the car with dozens — nay, hundreds — of ice balls in his coat. For some reason, ice balls take forever to melt. And when they do, they leave tons of water in your car. Wouldn’t you love to just spray them off, then quick-dry your dog’s legs and paws before hoisting him up into the car? He’s dry in minutes, his feet are clean, and he doesn’t have to spend the entire drive home sitting on what feels like four dozen quail eggs (not to mention the big ice balls that form between his toes).

What about those times when your dog steps in … well, you know. I’ve spent my fair share of time trying to dig it out of my dogs’ toes with whatever probe I could find, wiping it off with wet wipes or towels (then where do you put THOSE?), and generally cussing out people who don’t clean up after their dog. If I had a pressurized spray shower, I could blast the offending bits off my dog’s feet (or my own) and be on my way.

The RinseKit is catching on with campers, surfers, fishing enthusiasts, parents, and dog owners. A strong rinse, when ever you need it, is a beautiful thing. Unfortunately, the orders are coming in faster than Chris can make them. So he’s gone to crowdfunding to ramp up the manufacture. The first 200 people to contribute $50 or more get a RinseKit later this year. The project ends July 15, so don’t delay.

Get more info at http://www.rinsekit.com or be a part of it by backing this project at http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/165845490/breakthrough-portable-shower-system

Disclosure: I have no connection with Chris Crawford or his company, have received no payment for this article, and only found out about the RinseKit a couple of weeks ago. I just think it’s neat, and I thought you would, too.

 
 

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